Fascinating movie

FATAH: Here’s why a film made by Muslims provokes protests from Muslims

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Some Muslims, especially those who claim to be our community leaders, seem to take offense at anything and everything they disagree with. Whether it’s calling for the beheading of an Indian woman, Nupur Sharma, who merely read Islamic scriptures verbatim, or demanding a ban on British film The lady in the skywhich depicts the life of Fatima, the daughter of the Prophet Muhammad, they sometimes seem incapable of civilized and rational debate.

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We Muslims now seem to behave like dormant volcanoes erupting without warning. But what is intriguing about the controversy in Britain is that the film was produced and written by devout Muslims who follow the Shia branch of Islam and who have historically been ostracized and persecuted by Sunni Muslims throughout the Islamic world.

Although the Prophet himself is said to have anointed his son-in-law Ali as his successor after his last pilgrimage, he and his daughter Fatima were left outside the power structure of the emerging Islamic State of Medina. The property inherited by Fatima – the gardens of Fadak – was usurped and the Prophet’s own family was deprived of sustenance.

But Sunni Islamists for centuries denied this claim and under the Umayyad Caliphate of Damascus, the Prophet’s entire family was massacred in Karbala, Iraq, and the few survivors fled to India under the rule of Hindu ruler Raja Dahir. in Sindh. (today’s Pakistan).

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Back to the movie: Written by Shia Muslim cleric Sheikh Yasser al-Habib, The lady in the sky Executive producer Malik Shlibak told Sky News the film tells the story of “Lady Fatima’s life, her struggles, the journey she went through”, calling her “the first victim of terrorism”.

He continued: “We believe that she is the best figure in history for us (Muslims) today from whom we can learn, to know how to fight extremism, radicalism and corruption. And we thought it was important to share that story with the world.

Not so easy, as Shlibak would find out. After dozens of Islamists protested outside cinemas and called it blasphemous, Cineworld in the British city of Sheffield canceled a screening of the film. while radical Muslims picketed the theater and called it “blasphemous”. There was even reported songs of allahu akbar in front of the theatre.

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Malik Shlibak told the BBC: “Islam is a complex religion with various interpretations. Hundreds of millions of Muslims believe in what’s in the movie. On the question of the portrayal of the Prophet Muhammad, Shlibak rightly pointed out that not all Muslims believe that he cannot be portrayed.

He is right, and I have seen paintings of the Prophet.

As a Sunni Muslim married to a Shia, I can testify that the schism within Islam is extremely unbalanced with clear evidence from across the Islamic world that Shias are persecuted whether in Pakistan or Saudi Arabia ; Egypt (where they were practically wiped out) or Lebanon, Syria and Yemen.

The banning of a film telling the sad story of Lady Fatima is another example of the threat posed to us by the medieval world of Islamists who despise the “kafirs” (non-believers) as well as the Muslims whom they consider non-Muslims — including Shias.

The question facing us in Canada is: will our theaters show The lady in the sky or will they bow to the intimidation of Islamists as other Canadian institutions have done?

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